Archive for January, 2012

“Really lookin forward to #Bulls vs. #Heat. Regardless of the outcome, I will still think tht the Heat r better than the Bulls. #NBA ”

“The #Bulls hve improved w/ addition of Rip but the #Heat hve also gotten better w/ the addition of Battier & Norris Cole. #NBA

“A lack of a big man that is good at pick&poppin AND pick&rollin is killin the Bulls rt now. Boozer no longer is good at pick&rollin. #NBA

“The #Bulls need to stop playing one on one ball. Leave that to the#Heat#NBA

“Rose has been bailed out by some pretty poor calls today. #NBA

“Phenomenal shots by #DRose but damn son! Pass the ball to the open man. Those tough shots do not consistently go in.#Korverisopen

“It looked to me like LeBron travelled bfor he made tht hook shot.#NBA

“This game feels like the ECFinals all over again. Bulls struggle to score in 4th when LeBron is put on DRose. #NBA

“C’mon Rip. Keep DWade away from the paint! Back off if you have too! Sigh #NBA

“Unbelievable. It is time to start treatin DRose the same way tht we treat LeBron when it comes to free throw makin in the 4th quarter.#NBA

“Thibs should be yelling at Rip for not boxing out DWade. And DWade was def in bounds. #NBA

“Has lost all faith in DRose’s ability to take down the Heat by himself. 2 critical missed FTs & 11-28 fg. He needs help!! #Bulls #Heat #NBA

 

 

– Follow Mr. Okafor @Chiks13  — https://twitter.com/#!/Chiks13

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Elite QBs

Legacies At Stake Superbowl 46

Posted: January 30, 2012 in Bunker

Here’s a Rundown concerning what’s on the line next weekend in Indianapolis.

1. Eli Manning is going for his second Super Bowl which would thrust him passed his older, far more charismatic, brother  Peyton Manning on the all-time Super bowl title list.

2. Tom Brady is going for his 4th Super Bowl championship, which will open the “is he better than Joe Montana” conversation for the next 5-7 years.

3. The Bill Parcells Coaching tree will get its 8th Championship. Solidifying the Parcells’ coaching tree is royalty in the NFL.

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGw3soM07Yw%5D

4. Tom Coughlin attempts to put himself in position to be viewed as a Hall of Fame level coach.

5. Bill Belichick looks to become the coaching G.O.A.T.

6. New York vs. Boston… again.

7. The Super Bowl XLVI Championship.

 

 

Joe Paterno died Sunday morning from a broken heart.  The medical accounts file it as complications from lung cancer chemotherapy but through the eyes of those inside the athletic fraternity (sorority), Paterno’s quickly deteriorating health illustrates the power of sports.  Time and time again the general public “poo-poos” the role of sports in the lives of athletes and to a lesser degree coaches.  It is unsurprising that people cannot understand why players retire too late, make comebacks, and continuously stay close to the game.  It is their life.  In a sad phenomenon people separate their life from their job usually because their jobs fall short of their dreams.  Every once and a while, however, people do merge their talents, interests, and job and go all in to live their jobs because it is their life.  Joe Paterno represented this and his sudden death punctuated a football life.

It is impossible and perhaps too soon to look back fondly on the life (career?) of Joe Paterno without special attention to the child molestation scandal involving Jerry Sandusky.  People will rightly criticize the legendary coach for not doing enough to rid the school of the perverse figure.  People will probably mischaracterize what Paterno did not do thereby worsening the moral failing than realize the complexities of the situation and taking time to read that Paterno did contact authorities.  All of that, for now and for me, remains secondary to the importance of sports to people’s lives.  Favre, Jordan, and Elway all did it there way at times spoiling us and other times meeting our naïve expectations.  Paterno, the polarizing figure of today, represents the extreme.  Football gave him life and its absence took it away.

The attempt at flowery language here should not be confused with overdramatizing the life/death importance.  In 2008, Brent Musburger spoke about his relationship with Joe Paterno on the Dan Patrick Show.  Musburger’s words ring true today (courtesy of Deadspin’s transcript): “This is a tough one for me because I have to say up front that JoePa is a dear friend of mine…I’ll tell your listeners the truth as to why he still does it. He is fearful — and he looks back at Bear Bryant as the example — he is fearful that he would not be with us if he stepped away. He is a man that doesn’t fish, doesn’t play golf…he has no other interest other than his family and football. And he’s just afraid what would happen with the rest of his life if he walks away from it.”

Bear Bryant, it should be noted, died less than a month after coaching his final game.  Joe Paterno went from coaching an OVER-ACHIEVING Pennsylvania State University to losing his job and ultimately his desire to live.  It is a sad but real testament to the power of sports.  What happens after this will be more interesting.  Will his death lead to an intense focus on his good sides with the potential to overrate his career (re: Aaliyah, Michael Jackson, Heath Ledger)?  Or will the polarization of the crimes and the lack of institutional control overwhelm his legacy?  Only time will tell but as the play clock hit :00, the life clock also expired.  Joe Paterno: living life til the final whistle.

No one at this blog wrote about the NFL Divisional round which does not really bother me.  I suppose I am frustrated that the brilliance of Alex Smith, a guy everyone doubted accept me, is being underappreciated since Vernon Davis’ tears make him a hero.  I also do appreciate the end of Tebow-mania and the insistence that he played hurt only adding to his aura and/or brainwashing ridiculous Denver fans into believing in him.  Oh and the Editor-in-Chief’s Giants soundly defeated my mistake laden Green Bay Packers resulting in an unfortunate photo of me in a prematurely bought Super Bowl Champions hoodie from 2008 and a huge foam finger.  I hate him.  I hate the G-Men.  I hate non-Packers paraphernalia.  My grip is not with this today.

While watching football, I met someone who believed college basketball was better than the NBA which strikes me as foolish, contrarian, and/or incredibly illuminating to a world that I could not imagine understanding.  For all those who care, the college basketball season recently reached its halfway point punctuated by a Seth Davis Midseason Awards column and a collective yawn.  The big question, for me and for countless other sports fans, is when can we get to tourney time.  This is the biggest issue with the little brother of popular collegiate sports: the regular season is absolutely meaningless, unimaginative, and worst off boring.  While the BCS is loaded with flaws, the excitement of the regular season keeps fans interested while the post season attempts to ensure some good games by putting equally talented (or equal performers) against each other.  College basketball, conversely, does not ensure those match ups.  Most match ups really suck.  Where are the big games that consistently bring in casual fans?  When you need to play a game on an aircraft carrier – though cool- that tells me all that I need to know: the regular season is a sideshow circus.  Hell, the regular season is further upstaged by conference tournaments!  Who gets the conference banner between the winner of the single elimination conference tournament or the best team over the regular season!?  At least we can get good match-ups in these tournaments but those happen towards the end.  Also, who cares if 68 teams get in the ultimate tournament?  We generally know the top seeds and know that only ten schools really have shots to win it all.  We know there will be some Cinderella and that the dance will end in a thud for said team.  Shooting is more iffy, teams more mismatched, and free throw shooting as bad as the Miami Heat in crunch time represent but a few issues with this thing that should be better than the NBA.

While some people can suggest that the NBA regular season is too long and meaningless I push back by saying that seeding matters and on a nightly basis good teams compete against each other.  Part of the reason is that there are only 30 teams (roughly four too many in my opinion) rather than 300+.  Not my issue.  The athletes, usually, are more developed and the play is balanced sans the bottom 10 teams in the Eastern Conference compared to the West.  If the BCS is what the extreme looks like for regular season excitement and fun then College Basketball is the opposite extreme.  Both are not good.

So Syracuse is undefeated.  Great.  No one cares because it means nothing until one loss means the end of the season (re: Packers of Green Bay).  Until the Calendar changes to March, maybe earlier for conference tournaments, college basketball and its greatness will be contained as a secondary entity in our sports minds.  Want a solution that gives me something better than Virginia Commonwealth and Butler in the final four?  (Aside: Is there a more absurd system biased against the consistent best team for awarding a championship than the single elimination mega tournament?  Regular season body of work useless.  UConn, winner of the 2011 Big East Tournament on their way to the National Title was the 9th ranked team in their conference.  To be fair, the tournament does weight seeding for higher seeds which is nice but still what is the point if the regular season gets you nothing.  Recall: Only once have all four #1 seeds reached the final four and only six times have two #1 seeds reached the final four.)  Cut most of these lesser schools and teams out.  16 team tourney, best of three all the way through.  Gives me an element of fairness, more games between good schools, and fun for all.  Or double elimination, round robin.  Either way is better for me.

Alas, no one cares what I think which is fine by my standards and perhaps good for some in society.  What cannot be argued is that the regular season is deficient in many substantive performance and entertainment levels compared to the NBA.  56 days to March Madness and counting….

If you had to choose from these 20 players, who would make the final 12 man roster?

Guard

Kobe Byrant

Dwayne Wade

Chris Paul

Deron Williams

Derrick Rose

Russell Westbrook

Andre Iguodala

Eric Gordon

Chauncey Billups

Forward

Chris Bosh

Blake Griffin

Carmelo Anthony

Lebron James

Kevin Durant

Kevin Love

Rudy Gay

Lamar Odom

Center

Dwight Howard

LaMarcus Aldridge

Tyson Chandler

 

Allow me to dump a little knowledge on you Plebeians….

Kobe Byrant

Lebron James

Dwayne Wade

Christopher Wesson Bosh

Carmelo Anthony

Dwight Howard

Chris Paul

Deron Williams

Kevin Durant

Derrick Rose

Russell Westbrook

LaMarcus Aldridge

Yes, I have four point guards and I will ride with them.  As the un-great Jerry Colangelo noted in his teleconference on NBATV (shameful television) the international game has moved more towards the American version and has over emphasized the role of the point guard.  Carrying on Howard and Aldridge who can move to the five in crunch situations anchors a dynamic “small” lineup.  Also, Blake Griffin is underwhelming and should not be near this group.  Please and thanks!

ALL II

 

Here is my list:

Point Guards:

Chris Paul

Deron Williams

Derrick Rose

Shooting Guards

Kobe Bryant

Dwyane Wade

Small Forwards

Carmelo Anthony

LeBron James

Kevin Durant

Power Forwards

LaMarcus Aldridge

Kevin Love

Chris Bosh

Center

Dwight Howard

The international game favors versatility, outside shooting, and highly skilled big men. This roster meets each of those criteria.

The most difficult omission was Russell Westbrook. I debated between Love or Westbrook and I ultimately chose Love because he is an elite rebounder—a skill that no other player at his position possesses. While Westbrook is very explosive, he lacks any discernible skill advantage over his counterparts.

Also, because of the many excellent wing and post scorers on this team, it is paramount that the point guard is a good facilitator and I believe that Paul, DWill, and Rose are a class above Westbrook in that category.

Chika

 

Point Guards

Derrick Rose

Chris Paul

Deron Williams

Shooting Guards

Dwayne Wade

Kobe Bryant

Small Forwards

Lebron James

Carmelo Anthony

Kevin Durant

Power Forwards

LeMarcus Aldridge

Kevin Love

Chris Bosh

Center

Dwight Howard

Speed kills, but size matters. I like the fact that LaMarcus can play both Center and Forward in Olympic play. He’s also by far one of the most underrated players in the game. I’m sticking with only 3 PGs, given the fact that D. Rose is a shoot first guy anyways. This is just one incarnation of the Olympic Roster and I don’t see anyone coming close to beating the USA this year. I think these Olympics will be Dream Team ’92 esq. Even with all of the International Stars “catching up”.

Ed in Chief

Kenneth Allen finally emerges from the Thornwood High School’s men’s locker room around 20 minutes later than he had promised. He had taken a shower following the morning’s cross country practice and is now cleaned up and ready to be interviewed.

As he approaches, I ask Allen why it took him so long to shower and get dressed and the 17-year-old Junior responds, “I like to be fancy.”

An honest answer, indeed.

Allen is wearing a light grey, Thornwood shirt with blue letters across the front. Two hours earlier, he had arrived to practice with the shirt placed on a hanger, a scene that happens before every morning cross country practice. The shirt appears to be ironed with no visible wrinkles and his jeans are crisp as well. He is rocking pristine, white Samoas shoes. The lining of his hair is sharp and a well-kept jerry curl hairstyle sits atop his head.

Similar to many teenagers, Allen cares about his appearance, but the peculiar level of attention to detail that he shows towards his looks—a constant topic of playful ridicule by his teammates and coaches—differentiates Allen from his peers.

However, beyond his preoccupation with his appearance, what truly distinguishes Allen is his exceptional track ability.

Well Accomplished Despite Youth

In his sophomore year, Allen dominated the Junior Varsity Southwest Suburban Conference championship. He finished second in the open 100, prevailed in the open 200, and won the open 400 by 30 meters. A few weeks later, Allen led off the Thornwood High School 4×400 meter relay team that finished first at the class 3A State Championship. And then to conclude the season, Allen was apart of the 4×400 meter relay team that finished second at the 2011 New Balance Outdoor National High School Track and Field Championship, which took place at North Carolina A&T University in June. Comprised of seniors except for Allen, the team ran a time of 3 minutes and 14.07 seconds, breaking a 30-year-old Thornwood High School record by 3 seconds.

Conference champion. All-State athlete. High school All-American.

Outstanding accomplishments made even more remarkable by the fact that Allen achieved the aforementioned feats in only his first season running track.

“[We are] always looking for the next big thing and it could be Kenneth Allen. He is definitely on track. He is right on pace as one of the best sophomores to ever come through here,” says Brian Evans, head coach of the Thornwood Boy’s Track & Field team. “Very bright future for Kenneth Allen and he could leave here as the fastest guy.”

That is very high praise considering that Thornwood High School has a very rich boy’s track & field history. Thornwood won the class 3A State Championship four years consecutively from 2001-2004 and the majority of the many pictures taken of Thornwood all-state athletes that are framed and mounted on the walls of the hallway leading to the athletic director’s office belong to boy’s track & field standouts. Recently, to compensate for the gradually decreasing space for mounting pictures, Thornwood elected to heighten the requirement for a track & field athlete to appear on the wall. No longer does merely an appearance at State sufficiently warrant a picture; only a fifth or better finish at State suffices.

Deficient in Focus and Maturity

Allen first developed an interest in track during his freshman year at Thornwood. He played football for Thornwood in his freshman year and in accordance with his fickle disposition towards sports, he quickly lost interest in playing football. “I used to always come home and complain like ‘I can’t wait till football is over. I can’t wait. It is so boring and stuff like that,” recalls Allen.

Meanwhile, Allen was enrolled in an art class taught by Evans and regularly, track athletes stopped by the class to visit Evans. Sporadically, some of the track runners appeared sporting medals bestowed upon them as a result of winning a race or a meet. The medals greatly appealed to Allen and from then on, he coveted the shiny pieces of metal. Seeing the medals engendered his interest in track.

Eventually, in the fall of his sophomore year, Allen decided to try his hand at track and the first step was to join cross country because it provided valuable offseason training for track. Although he inconsistently attended cross country practices—he only attended a total of five—Allen managed to finish All-Conference in the Junior Varsity division.

The absences at the cross country practices were a microcosm of the issues that Allen needed to resolve before he could reach his full potential. He was immensely talented but lacked in focus and maturity. Overtime, he has improved in those areas and is now the epitome of perfect attendance at practices. According to Evans, Allen did not miss any summer and cross country practices in 2011.

“This is the kid that we couldn’t get to come out a year ago,” reflects Evans. “Again, that is part of the maturity but also, I think that he’s also starting to see that if I put my energy and focus into one direction and I give it my all, I can be really good.”

High Expectations for 2012

How good Allen will be in the 2012 track season is unknown but Evans has lofty expectations for Allen and perhaps more importantly, Allen expects plenty from himself. Allen wants to make it to State and Nationals in the 4×400 meter relay and personally, run 48 seconds in the open 400. Evans foresees that success will be much more difficult to achieve this season because Allen will not surprise anyone. “You are not a secret anymore. So, now that target kinda gets on you,” says Evans. He anticipates that Allen will have to compete with excellent contemporaries from Homewood-Flossmoor High School, Nequa Valley High School, and Northside College Prep High School for the first place spot in the open 400 at State.

While Allen worries about how to fix the misaligned strand of hair or how to wash off the speck of dirt on his shoes, he will strive to continually improve and will gladly welcome the increase in attention that, presumably, will occur if he remains on this path to high school track superstardom.

“He likes the glory. He likes the spotlight. He likes the picture and the name in the newspaper. He likes his name on the announcements. He likes the picture on the wall. He loves it,” says Evans. “Hopefully he is the superstar but not because he told you about it.”

Allen –

Maybe too many people fell asleep during LSU-Alabama, a reminder that defense is still important and can indeed take over games not played in monsoons or blizzards, because no one discusses the multitude of uncapitalized scoring chances by Alabama thanks to special teams woes.  Four attempted field goals failed to cross the uprights (three during regulation) kept the game tight and gave LSU field position which they did nothing with.  It is ridiculous to think people feel sorry for Boise State because of their kicker but do not use the same logic for Alabama.  Hell, I am sorry anyone had to watch any ACC team during BCS season but I digress.  These teams are even, Alabama still has the better quarterback, and I do not expect Bama to miss four field goals again. 
Alabama 20 – Louisiana State 14.
Bunk – LSU by double digits
Chika – Tim Tebow.

The perpetually busy though highly acclaimed Editor-In-Chief wanted my take on a segment of First Take regarding Tim Tebow, race, and assessments of his ability as a quarterback.  I should say that I am writing this after watching Tebow throw for 316 yards, two touchdowns, and rushing for another in an unlikely win over the Pittsburgh Steelers, a team everyone felt confident as labeling best in the AFC despite injuries galore to most everyone of significance.  You can find the episode here and begin listening around 50:00 into the segment.

  • First, the extended opening about talking about the subject of race “head on” and that “everyone is friends” really undercuts the reality of the moment.  We know race is contentious especially when discussed by people in two different racial groups but there is no need for the extra sugar coating.
  • Rob Parker highlights a very good difference between young black players and older black players.  Young players enjoy the free formed controlled chaos that Tebow brings because – I think – they grew up watching quarterbacks possess a more athletic side with the ability to run and throw PLUS Tebow embodies a toughness people see declining in football in general (re: concussions).  Older players see Tebow as another exception to the rule: black, mobile quarterbacks are forced to be defensive backs and wide receivers.  Tebow gets a team to cater to him (players, coaching, and offensive design) and is allowed a chance to succeed.  This point totally dismisses the point that Tebow enjoyed phenomenal success in Florida amid is throwing deficiencies.  Winning national titles (though aided by Chris Leak for one) and playing at a premier program carries weight – for better or worse.  To be fair, high profile black quarterbacks did go on to be drafted and enjoyed support: Michael Vick (VaTech); Vince Young (Texas); Cameron Newton (Auburn).
  • Fewer things irritate me more than the witch hunt and populist movement to get rid of Kyle Orton.  I’ve whined about this for months but Skip highlighting Orton’s 4-14 record in his last 18 starts ignores the bottom five rushing attack (Knowshon Moreno led by the way), bottom five rush defense, and bottom five passing defense.  Orton’s numbers far outpace Tebow’s figures EVERYTIME.  When the team has him listed as the third quarterback behind Brady Friggin Quinn and he suddenly is starting, that is an organization bending to fan pressure.  If he cannot get it done in practice, logic suggests there is no way he could do it against an opponent and he didn’t for 55 minutes (sans Steelers game).
  • Kordell Stewart, who obviously takes this personally and understandably so, raised an interesting point about what happens when a black quarterback struggles.  There appears to be a lack of opportunities given to black back-ups and in some cases the leash can be pulled quickly when things do not work out.  Stewart was benched after three games following his team MVP the season before.  That is messed up undoubtedly but it should be noted that his team MVP season was not that impressive: 14TD, 11INT, 3100yrds, 7yrd/att, 5 rushing TDs, 8 fumbles.  Not exactly world beater.  But Stewart did not go on to brighter prospects either.  He simply faded.  One issue that needs to be put on the table is the number of black quarterbacks is significantly smaller than white quarterbacks.
  • His passion and frustration for a lack of black options should also account for skills being evaluated between white quarterbacks.  Brady Quinn should have an issue if he is sitting around and NO ONE seems to want to spend time on him.  Stewart raises the issue of Jake Delhomme but it should be noted that no one was giving him a shot in general and the Texans only called him up because they were down to their final QB – a 3rd string rookie.
  • Raising Kerry Collins is a bad example given the royal screw job done to Curtis Painter.  Again, not saying Painter is a world beater but to decide to go to another option instead of developing him is the exact issue Stewart is raising with black quarterbacks.  Don’t forget, the number of black quarterbacks – however- is still INCREDIBLY small and broad in talent levels.
  • Here is a brief list of black quarterbacks of value active or around during recent history (not including the great Tee Martin)*(year drafted)*: Steve McNair (95), Charlie Batch (98), Akili Smith (99), Shaun King (99), Daunte Culpepper (99), Donovan McNabb (99), Aaron Brooks (00), Michael Vick (01), Quincy Carter (01), David Garrard (02), Byron Leftwich (03), Cleo Lemon (04), Seneca Wallace (05), Jason Campbell (05), Vince Young (06), Tavaris Jackson (06), Troy Smith (07), Jamarcus Russell (07), Dennis Dixon (08), Josh Freeman (09), Mark Sanchez – minority- (09), Joe Webb (10), and Cam Newton (12) to name a few.
  • Many of these quarterbacks began as backups and eventually became starters. McNabb, to me, is BY FAR the most accomplished.  Second is probably Steve McNair.  Third is Michael Vick who is exciting but lacks health and playoff success.  Point is that this list goes downhill very quickly with surprises (Tavaris Jackson starting), youth success and building for the skill set (McNabb, Newton), busts (Smith, Russell), and those still waiting (Heisman Trophy Winner Troy Smith, Dennis Dixon, etc).  Point is, being slighted stands out more when there are far fewer viable options to do the job.  Many white starters and some backups out perform this list.  McNabb is a notable target of criticism by both whites and blacks for just about everything he does.  Absolutely unfair.

Ultimately, it is good to hear the emotions behind the Tebow saga which begin on the field but fester and develop almost always off the field.  After watching this performance, more young people will marvel and claim Tebow to be a boss while older players like Kordell Stewart will be left wondering what could’ve been.  What is true is that an unjust move in football comes to everyone all the time but I see a picture that is starting to look more balanced than years before and everyone should be happier about that.

I remember when I was in high school, I had an AP US History teacher who was a staunch conservative. He just so happened to be the best and most charismatic teacher I had at a school that lacked (to put it nicely) adequate teachers. He preached to me about the greatness of Ronald Reagan and often mentioned how George W. Bush would be seen as an American hero and one of the great leaders of our generation when all is said and done. He was hawk, so I was a hawk. He said things like “Liberals yap about personal responsibility and wanting government handouts,” so I used the same talking points as well. I was a parrot and I was of the age where I could be molded into a conservative, although I was a black kid from the inner city. I even read conscience of a conservative by Barry Goldwater going into my freshman year of college, which gave me a strong theoretical background in idea of conservatism. On paper it sounded amazing! I thought everyone should live their lives that way. So again, I took these talking points and applied them into arguments against my liberal friends (everyone else in my world). Although I was able to survive in the inner city based on some of the great liberal programs, I conveniently ignored it, because it fit my narrative. Somewhere along the lines (college) I decided to drop and deal with realities and facts. Today I’m a liberal (for better or for worse).

I say all that to say, I have finally reached the point of disgust and annoyance when it comes to the subject of LeBron James. Despite all the evidence (statistics and just watching basketball), there are a large segment “basketball fans” who continue to try to make arguments for other players that are better or on the level of one LeBron James. I feel the need to address this only because I have had arguments over and over where I am in the minority of people who think LeBron is a great player. I will argue that much of this is due to what I suffered from when I was 17: Listening to talking points and ignoring the facts. 


First let me lay out my relationship as a fan with one LeBron James.

The Cleveland Years: 


I could not stand LeBron. Mainly because he played for Cleveland. Cleveland. Worst of all his team was garbage and somehow they won 60 games every year. It didn’t make any sense to me. There’s no way that guy was that good. In hindsight, the reason I couldn’t stand him was because I had to listen to Cleveland fans jump on a bandwagon of a team that should have been contracted years ago. The last time I thought of Cleveland was when I realized my Terrell Brandon rookie card was no longer worth anything. LeBron, for all of his “greatness” was a boring, uncontroversial player. Cookie-cutter, “he had fun playing the game” and won MVPs. He didn’t stand for anything and he was the chosen one. The ratings even for his greatest successes were awful.

The Decision: Wow. That was weird. I tuned in though. I liked his gall though.

Miami Years: It was clear that the Decision, the subsequent ridiculous party and this new-found love for Kobe Bryant going around the league put the NBA back on the map. I’m cool with it. And you know what I like LeBron now. He created the controversies and the rivalries basketball needed outside of Boston and LA. The ratings don’t lie.

***

Debunking the Myths 


“LeBron Didn’t Show Up in the Playoffs in 2010” – Except LeBron led his team in Points and Assists in all three rounds prior to the NBA Finals. Including carrying a struggling Dwayne Wade through the Conference Finals and shutting down the MVP Derrick Rose. Yes, LeBron had an epic collapse for LeBron in the finals. He did not put up anywhere near his average stats 25PPG  7RPG and 7APG (Regular Season) and  17.8 points, 6.8 assists, and 7.1 rebounds (Finals average). However, considering that only about 3 or 4 men in history have averaged anywhere near what LeBron has, you think he would get the respect. But okay fine.


“LeBron can’t close/ LeBron isn’t clutch” – Again I point to both the Boston series and the Chicago Bulls series to disprove that. Not to mention the Detroit Series when he SINGLEHANDEDLY  defeated a team with 25 straight points leading a pathetic Cleveland team to the NBA Finals [WATCH IT. JUST WATCH IT]. I don’t know when clutch became making the final shot with less than 10 seconds. But if you want to make that argument again see here.

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3fD1MNjkPFs%5D

But just to end this let’s just throw out the statistics:

Now at this juncture can anyone make the case RATIONALLY that there are better players the LeBron. Apparently the test is championships. Durant has 0, Rose has 0 and none of them can even touch LeBron on either side of the ball. Yes, Kobe has 5, but are we going to take a 33 year old 16 years in the league Kobe against a legendary player in his prime? Dirk?

Now that I’m done with this rant. I’m embarrassed that I even wrote it… Oh well.

2011-2012 Season:

GP FGM-FGA   FGM-FGA 3PM- FG% 3PA – 3P% FTA  – FTM FT% RPG APG   BLKPG STLPG PFPG              TO
2011-12 Regular Season 7 36.1 11.1-18.7 .595 0.0-0.1 .000 7.6-9.6 .791 7.7 7.4 0.9 2.0 1.9 2.9 PPG 29.9
Career 634 40.1 9.9-20.5 .480 1.4-4.1 .329 6.6-8.9 .745 7.1 7.0 0.8 1.7 2.0 3.3 27.7